Economics in 335 Words

Tom Sargent, a Professor at NYU, won the 2011 Nobel prize in economics (together with Chris Sims) for his work on “rational expectations” theory.   Four years before that, he gave a speech to Berkeley undergraduates which reads in its entirety: I remember...

Ronald Coase, 1910 – 2013

Ronald Coase died Monday in Chicago at 102. The Nobel Laureate in Economics in 1991, his two most famous papers, The Nature of the Firm (1937) and The Problem of Social Cost (1960) began by asking such profoundly simple questions—the word “childlike” is...

Happy 4th of July

Our custom on America’s Independence Day for several years has been to publish a photo of fireworks—the real thing from the annual display over the Hudson River here in little old New York (albeit one year delayed)—but this year we’re deviating from that...

2012: Year in Review

We’ve never done a year-end review, and don’t count this (The “First Annual” if you wish) a precedent, but I thought it worthwhile to build one of the final columns of 2012 around what law firm leaders are saying. So without further ado, as the...

Calling All Lapsed Lawyers

Lapsed lawyers are one of our favorite groups, because they tend to be so diverse in their backgrounds, motivations (for lapsing) and current post-law situations. And we finally have an opportunity to find out  more about you all. Please follow this link to take a...

2012 Economics Nobel

On Monday the 2012 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science was awarded to Lloyd Shapley and Al Roth, for their work on market design and matching theory, which relate to how individuals and firms find and select one another in areas from school choice to jobs to...
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